Dr. Starpoli's Blog

Antireflux Surgery and GERD Drug Therapy Achieve Similar Results

Posted by Anthony Starpoli on Jun 4, 2011 11:43:00 AM


 
A report was published in the May 18 issue ofA report was published in the May 18 issue of Journal of the American Medical Association. In, what is referred to as the LOTUS (Long-Term Usage of Esomeprazole vs Surgery for Treatment of Chronic GERD) study, remission rates at five years were 92% (95% CI 89 to 96) for patients on esomeprazole and 85% (95% CI 81 to 90, P=0.048) for those who had laparoscopic antireflux surgery, according to Jean-Paul Galmiche, MD, of Nantes University in France, and colleagues. 

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Anthony A. Starpoli, MD | www.starpoli.com

Reflux, TIF, fundoplication, GERD, nonacid reflux, EsophyX

Long Term Use of PPI Drugs to Treat Heartburn May Deplete Magnesium

Posted by Rachel Jones on Mar 29, 2011 12:05:00 PM

Over the last few years, new studies have been released that indicate that the long-term use of PPI drugs to treat GERD may be detrimental to some patients. Most recently, the FDA warned that long-term use of PPI’s can be linked to magnesium depletion. See below:

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Anthony A. Starpoli, MD | www.starpoli.com

GERD, heartburn, EsophyX

Does GERD increase with age?

Posted by Anthony Starpoli on Jan 3, 2011 8:46:00 AM

As reported in MedWire (12/31, Albert) reported that after reviewing 16 studies, UK researchers concluded "that the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) does not increase with age, but that esophageal symptoms of sufferers become more severe as they get older." According to the paper in Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, the "largest of these studies (n=11,945) showed that the prevalence of severe reflux esophagitis increased significantly with age from 12% in those younger than 21 years to 37% in those aged 70 years or above," but "heartburn was less common in older than younger GERD patients." Investigators also pointed out that "esophageal 24-hour acid exposure time increased by 1.1% for each additional decade in age," while "ineffective esophageal motility increased and abdominal lower esophageal sphincter length decreased with age."

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Anthony A. Starpoli, MD | www.starpoli.com

GERD, atypical reflux, EsophyX